Carthage Contemporary
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CHKOUN AHNA
ON THE TRACK OF HISTORY

12 May - 15 June 2012

An International
Contemporary Art Exhibition
at the National Museum of Carthage

Ahmed Mater
Ahmet Ögüt
Ali Tnani
Amina Menia
Ayşe Erkmen
Boris Kajmak
Fakhri El Ghezal
Félix Fernández Fernández
Hala Elkoussy
Ismail Bahri
Kader Attia
Lara Favaretto
Mouna Karray
Mustapha Akrim
Nadia Kaabi-Linke
Nicène Kossentini
Nida Sinnokrot
Pascal Hachem
Pauline M’barek
Saâdane Afif
Sirine Fattouh
Taysir Batniji
Timo Nasseri
Yousef Moscatello
Ziad Antar
Zineb Sedira

Many things changed after spring 2011. Today, Tunisian society seems to culminate in a hunt for identity. The international exhibition CHKOUN AHNA will slow down this endeavour and offer an unhurried view on the current state of emergency.

The expression "chkoun ahna" comes from the Tunisian dialect written in Roman letters. It has two meanings; "about us" and "who are we?", it can be phrased as a statement or a question. All efforts to purify Tunisian heritage and sort out a homogeneous cultural identity are doomed to fail. Tunisian history was and still is a cross-cultural joint venture. There were Caspian and Berber civilizations, Phoenicians, Romans, Vandals, Arabs, Otto-man and the French. Discussion of Tunisian culture implies all these hybrid influences.

For this reason, the exhibition will raise the question as a statement powered by the media of contemporary art, such as installations, video and photo works, drawings, performances and interventions. Similar to the country's cross-cultural history, the invited artists hail from countries that have left historical traces in Carthage, in the more or less chronological order of Algeria, Lebanon, Italy, Germany, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Morocco, Spain, Turkey, and France.

CHKOUN AHNA will show recent and new artworks from Amina Menia, Kader Attia, Ziad Antar, Taysir Batniji, Lara Favaretto, Yousef Moscatello, Nicène Kossentini, Timo Nasseri, Ahmed Mater, Mustapha Akrim, Hala Elkoussy, Nida Sinnokrot, Pauline M'barek, Fakhri El Ghezal, Nadia Kaabi-Linke, Ayşe Erkmen, Ahmet Öğüt, Ismail Bahri, Félix Fernández, Zineb Sedira, Mouna Karray, Sirine Fattouh, Ali Tnani.

The exhibition is curated by Khadija Hamdi and Timo Kaabi-Linke

CHKOUN AHNA
ON THE TRACK OF HISTORY

12 May - 15 June 2012

An International
Contemporary Art Exhibition
at the National Museum of Carthage

Ahmed Mater
Ahmet Ögüt
Ali Tnani
Amina Menia
Ayşe Erkmen
Boris Kajmak
Fakhri El Ghezal
Félix Fernández Fernández
Hala Elkoussy
Ismail Bahri
Kader Attia
Lara Favaretto
Mouna Karray
Mustapha Akrim
Nadia Kaabi-Linke
Nicène Kossentini
Nida Sinnokrot
Pascal Hachem
Pauline M’barek
Saâdane Afif
Sirine Fattouh
Taysir Batniji
Timo Nasseri
Yousef Moscatello
Ziad Antar
Zineb Sedira

Many things changed after spring 2011. Today, Tunisian society seems to culminate in a hunt for identity. The international exhibition CHKOUN AHNA will slow down this endeavour and offer an unhurried view on the current state of emergency.

The expression "chkoun ahna" comes from the Tunisian dialect written in Roman letters. It has two meanings; "about us" and "who are we?", it can be phrased as a statement or a question. All efforts to purify Tunisian heritage and sort out a homogeneous cultural identity are doomed to fail. Tunisian history was and still is a cross-cultural joint venture. There were Caspian and Berber civilizations, Phoenicians, Romans, Vandals, Arabs, Otto-man and the French. Discussion of Tunisian culture implies all these hybrid influences.

For this reason, the exhibition will raise the question as a statement powered by the media of contemporary art, such as installations, video and photo works, drawings, performances and interventions. Similar to the country's cross-cultural history, the invited artists hail from countries that have left historical traces in Carthage, in the more or less chronological order of Algeria, Lebanon, Italy, Germany, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Morocco, Spain, Turkey, and France.

CHKOUN AHNA will show recent and new artworks from Amina Menia, Kader Attia, Ziad Antar, Taysir Batniji, Lara Favaretto, Yousef Moscatello, Nicène Kossentini, Timo Nasseri, Ahmed Mater, Mustapha Akrim, Hala Elkoussy, Nida Sinnokrot, Pauline M'barek, Fakhri El Ghezal, Nadia Kaabi-Linke, Ayşe Erkmen, Ahmet Öğüt, Ismail Bahri, Félix Fernández, Zineb Sedira, Mouna Karray, Sirine Fattouh, Ali Tnani.

The exhibition is curated by Khadija Hamdi and Timo Kaabi-Linke

Artists

  • Ahmed Mater

    Ahmed Mater
    Lives and works in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    Ahmed Mater is considered to be one of the most influential contemporary artists of Saudi Arabia. His art is grounded by his educational background as a physician and the religious and cultural contexts of Saudi Arabia. His body of work that includes photography, calligraphy, painting, installation and video explores the narratives and aesthetics of the Islamic culture in times of globalization and consumerism.

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    Ahmed Mater

    Ahmed Mater
    Ahmed Mater
    Ahmed Mater
    Ahmed Mater
    Ahmed Mater
    Lives and works in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    Ahmed Mater is considered to be one of the most influential contemporary artists of Saudi Arabia. His art is grounded by his educational background as a physician and the religious and cultural contexts of Saudi Arabia. His body of work that includes photography, calligraphy, painting, installation and video explores the narratives and aesthetics of the Islamic culture in times of globalization and consumerism.

    The photo series "Magnetism", shows a magnet in the centre of the image that is attracting thousands of iron filings that symbolize the attractive forces of the Ka’aba. The installation that is reproduced in this photograph was shown at the British Museum in London, as part of the exhibition Hajj (pilgrimage).

    Ahmet Ögüt

    Ahmet Ögüt
    Lives and works currently in Amsterdam.

    Ahmet Öğüt’s performances, installations, drawings, videos and photo works draw attention to the political and economic control of private and public life.

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    Ahmet Ögüt

    Ahmet Ögüt
    Ahmet Ögüt
    Lives and works currently in Amsterdam.

    Ahmet Öğüt’s performances, installations, drawings, videos and photo works draw attention to the political and economic control of private and public life.

    He employs travesty and a strong reductionism to reveal overseen mechanisms and institutions of repression. Furthermore he collects lost anecdotes that reconnect the common actuality of a place with overwritten and/or forgotten histories. In one word, his artistic practice resembles a micro-invasive intervention into the everyday life that uncovers hidden mechanisms of perception and knowledge production.

    Ali Tnani

    Ali Tnani
    Born in 1982 in Tunis, Tunisia, lives and works between Tunis and Paris

    Ali Tnani works with various type of medias, such as photography, drawing and sound installation. Since 2007 he works on the idea of the “rest” and on the memory of missing places. Through photographs, drawings and paintings he proposes new ways of seeing things lost their destiny. Pieces of bread, torn fabrics, bones lying around next to a garbage can, or pieces of peel, become the landmarks in his "Cartography of the rest".

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    Ali Tnani

    Ali Tnani
    Ali Tnani
    Ali Tnani
    Ali Tnani
    Born in 1982 in Tunis, Tunisia, lives and works between Tunis and Paris

    Ali Tnani works with various type of medias, such as photography, drawing and sound installation. Since 2007 he works on the idea of the “rest” and on the memory of missing places. Through photographs, drawings and paintings he proposes new ways of seeing things lost their destiny. Pieces of bread, torn fabrics, bones lying around next to a garbage can, or pieces of peel, become the landmarks in his "Cartography of the rest".

  • Amina Menia

    Amina Menia
    Born in 1976 in Alger, Algeria

    Menia’s work questions the relationship between architectural and historical spaces, and challenges conventional notions around the exhibition space.

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    Amina Menia

    Amina Menia
    Amina Menia
    Amina Menia
    Amina Menia
    Amina Menia
    Amina Menia
    Born in 1976 in Alger, Algeria

    Menia’s work questions the relationship between architectural and historical spaces, and challenges conventional notions around the exhibition space.

    The body of her work can be read as a minimal lexicon that underlines alternative notions of historical places, revisits urban legends, and points out urban gaps by ephemeral interventions. Her artworks are a crossovers of sculptures and installations that trigger an interaction of viewers and passersby with socio-spatial configurations.

    Ayşe Erkmen

    Ayşe Erkmen
    Ayşe Erkmen, Construction, 2009, Intervention at the South London Gallery with, handwritten text on builders helmets, dimensions variable, Courtesy of the artist

    Menia’s work questions the relationship between architectural and historical spaces, and challenges conventional notions around the exhibition space.

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    Ayşe Erkmen

    Ayşe Erkmen
    Ayşe Erkmen
    Ayşe Erkmen
    Ayşe Erkmen
    Ayşe Erkmen, Construction, 2009, Intervention at the South London Gallery with, handwritten text on builders helmets, dimensions variable, Courtesy of the artist

    Menia’s work questions the relationship between architectural and historical spaces, and challenges conventional notions around the exhibition space.

    The body of her work can be read as a minimal lexicon that underlines alternative notions of historical places, revisits urban legends, and points out urban gaps by ephemeral interventions. Her artworks are a crossovers of sculptures and installations that trigger an interaction of viewers and passersby with socio-spatial configurations.

    Boris Kajmak

    Boris Kajmak
    Born in 1980, in Zadar, Croatia, lives and works in Berlin

    Boris Kajmak is an interdisciplinary artist whose work explores social realms through the use of materials, plays and languages.

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    Boris Kajmak

    Boris Kajmak
    Boris Kajmak
    Boris Kajmak
    Born in 1980, in Zadar, Croatia, lives and works in Berlin

    Boris Kajmak is an interdisciplinary artist whose work explores social realms through the use of materials, plays and languages.

    He treats value systems as if they were founded objects with an accent on perception and psychology. His conceptual approach has generated sculpture, design and architectural pieces that have been exhibited internationally since 1999.

  • Fakhri El Ghezal

    Fakhri El Ghezal
    Born in 1981, in Akouda, Tunisia, lives and works in Akouda, Tunisia

    While appropriating the history of intimate places through the media of photography, Fakhri El Ghezal uncovers characteristic features of collective mentalities.

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    Fakhri El Ghezal

    Fakhri El Ghezal
    Fakhri El Ghezal
    Fakhri El Ghezal
    Fakhri El Ghezal
    Fakhri El Ghezal
    Fakhri El Ghezal
    Fakhri El Ghezal
    Fakhri El Ghezal
    Born in 1981, in Akouda, Tunisia, lives and works in Akouda, Tunisia

    While appropriating the history of intimate places through the media of photography, Fakhri El Ghezal uncovers characteristic features of collective mentalities.

    In the photo series Oueld Min he employs the classic monochrome camera like a fathometer displaying the historical depth of his own private and contemporary microcosm.

    Félix Fernández Fernández

    Félix Fernández Fernández
    Born 1977, in Viveiro, Spain, lives and works in Madrid

    Fernández Fernández’s work is about relationships of individuals in their contemporary surroundings that organize and control time, space, body and personal and social identities. He employs a wide range of media and formats like video, sound, installations and cross-media hybrids assembling photography and performance.

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    Félix Fernández Fernández

    Félix Fernández Fernández
    Félix Fernández Fernández
    Félix Fernández Fernández
    Félix Fernández Fernández
    Born 1977, in Viveiro, Spain, lives and works in Madrid

    Fernández Fernández’s work is about relationships of individuals in their contemporary surroundings that organize and control time, space, body and personal and social identities. He employs a wide range of media and formats like video, sound, installations and cross-media hybrids assembling photography and performance.

    The present body plays a key role in his work and often he features himself, adding a private autobiographical dimension that encounters a more socially constructed symbolism of objects and situations.

    Hala Elkoussy

    Hala Elkoussy
    Born in 1974, In Cairo, Egypt, lives and works in Amsterdam

    The installations, videos and photo works of Hala Elkoussy explore the limits and potentials of visual media against oblivion. In most of her work she captures ephemeral states of collective memories of her home town Cairo.

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    Hala Elkoussy

    Hala Elkoussy
    Hala Elkoussy
    Hala Elkoussy
    Born in 1974, In Cairo, Egypt, lives and works in Amsterdam

    The installations, videos and photo works of Hala Elkoussy explore the limits and potentials of visual media against oblivion. In most of her work she captures ephemeral states of collective memories of her home town Cairo.

    Myths and religious beliefs, rumours and facts, urban legends and other legends as well as any further words of mouth narratives that once went through an aperture seem to be recovered and sealed in a growing puzzle of iconic mementos.

  • Ismail Bahri

    Ismail Bahri
    Born in 1978, in Tunis, Tunisia, lives and works between Paris and Lyon, France, and Tunis, Tunisia

    The work of Ismail Bahri takes various forms, ranging from drawings to video, photography and installation. Many of his work explores processes and proper material qualities that reflect a minimalist and often graphically powerful content. His research focuses on these “tipping points”, where a tiny change can make a big difference, where a systems failure and stability collapses.

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    Ismail Bahri

    Ismail Bahri
    Ismail Bahri
    Ismail Bahri
    Ismail Bahri
    Ismail Bahri
    Ismail Bahri
    Born in 1978, in Tunis, Tunisia, lives and works between Paris and Lyon, France, and Tunis, Tunisia

    The work of Ismail Bahri takes various forms, ranging from drawings to video, photography and installation. Many of his work explores processes and proper material qualities that reflect a minimalist and often graphically powerful content. His research focuses on these “tipping points”, where a tiny change can make a big difference, where a systems failure and stability collapses.

    He further concentrates on the ephemeral, the invisible and the vulnerable.
    The Ligne fantôme qui hante les murs du musée de Carthage / Phantom Line haunting the walls in the Carthage Museum is a barely visible broken line of shadows that appears only in the momentum of its disappearance. It’s just one moment during the day, when the sun takes a certain position and the small shadows of each individual pin form a continuous line before they splinter again into different directions.

    Kader Attia

    Kader Attia
    Born in 1970, in Dugny, France , lives and works in Berlin, Germany and Algiers, Algeria

    Kader Attia was born in 1970 in an Algerian family in Paris. He spent his childhood between France and Algeria, going back and forth between the Christian Occident and the Islamic Maghreb, has had a decisive impact on his work. Using his own identities, as the starting point, he tackles the increasingly difficult relationship between Europe and immigrants, particularly those of Islamic faith, in installations, video and photo works.

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    Kader Attia

    Kader Attia
    Kader Attia
    Kader Attia
    Born in 1970, in Dugny, France , lives and works in Berlin, Germany and Algiers, Algeria

    Kader Attia was born in 1970 in an Algerian family in Paris. He spent his childhood between France and Algeria, going back and forth between the Christian Occident and the Islamic Maghreb, has had a decisive impact on his work. Using his own identities, as the starting point, he tackles the increasingly difficult relationship between Europe and immigrants, particularly those of Islamic faith, in installations, video and photo works.

    Kader Attia, The History of a Myth, 2010

    Wide Screens for Tiny Objects

    While installing “History of a Myth”, the multimedia installation of French-Algerian artist Kader Attia, I recalled an exhibition I saw in the Amsterdam Film Museum many years ago. The title of this show was “Big Lies of a Little Camera”, and it gathered reconstructions and adaptations of optical apparatuses and visual tech gadgets from the pre-cimema era. All the devices did quite the opposite of the cinematographic appliance. Instead of hiding the source of the viewer’s illusion in a small projection room, they clearly exposed the interplay of mechanics and optics, movement and light, and finally denuded the idea of the moving picture.
    Time and techniques have changed, but Attia’s installation plays with these same issues, although in a different way. Rather than deconstructing habits of perception, it touches on the very base of any technically and artificially generated image; rather than exposing the illusion in viewers’ minds, it unveils the powerful technical translation of imaging devices. While both the original sculpture (a screw nut) and its magnified reproduction as a technical image occupy the same room, the first thing viewers see is not the miniature sculpture, but its blown up CCTV image. The size of the screen wipes out the presence of the real object, and without knowing beforehand, the small image source as well as the CCTV camera next to the screen are not evident.
    The imposing image shows nothing but a simple screw nut, one of the cheapest and most ordinary items one can get at any hardware store. However, due to the impressive representation that is related to the calculated distance between video projector and screen, it automatically reminds viewers of the Dome of the Rock. The building on the Temple Mount connects all three Monotheisms; it represents the Holy of the Holies for Jews, for Christians it shelters the Holy Wisdom, and for Muslims it is the place of Muhammad’s ascendance towards heaven. More than half of the global human population know this building, and due to technical translation that is quite usual in surveillance and broadcasting, many of these people could easily confuse the image of a tiny nut with the representation of one of the most popular mystical monuments on Earth.
    The technique of co-authoring this “big lie” is a small macroscopic lense on the body of a CCTV camera that is directly connected to the video projector via a BNC cable. But the most alienating element in this setting is the atmospheric sound of wind that was recorded on esplanades in front of mosques in Jerusalem.
    “The History of a Myth” is not about illusions ĺike the cinema; the tiny nut is mounted on the right side next to the screen and the technical arrangement is indeed barely visible, but there was no intention to hide anything of this from the viewers’ eyes. However, the installation is telling us mostly about the underpinning lies in the relation of technical media and fragmented realities, as well as about the omnipresence of a myth that appears everywhere for anyone who believes in it.
    Contemporary art is a field of many different strategies and practices. Some artist still make use of illusions; they are lying to tell you the truth, and by doing so, they are somehow following the path of pre-modern arts. Others are stuck on the track of modernity and telling the truth to uncover a lie. Attia’s installation seems to be the crossroad for both tendencies. Besides all the implied metaphors on identity and belief, the “History of a Myth” perfectly deconstructs the myth of media art by showing the lie of a blown up image next to the reality of its tiny object.

    by
    Timo Kaabi-Linke

    Lara Favaretto

    Lara Favaretto
    Born in 1973, in Treviso, Italy, lives and works in Turin, Italy

    Lara Favaretto’s installations, objects and photo work play with the ambiguity of carnival and resignation. She creates situations that are lying beyond rational standards and economical rules and are full of enjoyable and playful absurdities. While employing strategies like modifications of objects and their isolations from usual contexts she draws attention to special characteristics that unveil tragic-comical features.

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    Lara Favaretto

    Lara Favaretto
    Lara Favaretto
    Lara Favaretto
    Lara Favaretto
    Lara Favaretto
    Born in 1973, in Treviso, Italy, lives and works in Turin, Italy

    Lara Favaretto’s installations, objects and photo work play with the ambiguity of carnival and resignation. She creates situations that are lying beyond rational standards and economical rules and are full of enjoyable and playful absurdities. While employing strategies like modifications of objects and their isolations from usual contexts she draws attention to special characteristics that unveil tragic-comical features.

    Lara Favaretto's work AS IF A RUIN (2012) was a site-specific adaptation of her confetti sculptures, consisting of about 800 pounds of confetti shaped to form a dark brown cube that referred to the ashes of Carthage the day after it was burned down by the army of the Roman Empire. The work touched on the historical depth of the site: a 'momentary monument' that decomposed and degraded during the time of the exhibition.

  • Mouna Karray

    Mouna Karray
    Born in 1970, in Sfax, Tunisia, lives and works in Paris, France, and Sfax, Tunisia

    Identities, borders and the histories of places are the recurring themes of Mouna Karray’s work as well as in her sound installation An Object on the Shore (2008).

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    Mouna Karray

    Mouna Karray
    Mouna Karray
    Born in 1970, in Sfax, Tunisia, lives and works in Paris, France, and Sfax, Tunisia

    Identities, borders and the histories of places are the recurring themes of Mouna Karray’s work as well as in her sound installation An Object on the Shore (2008).

    First, a chanted recitation of the Quran, interrupted by external noise for a living (street noise, voices questioning and groping, barking dogs), followed by Arabic songs (songs of Abdel Halim) and a further interruption by radio, crowned by a Koranic recital.
    Sounds which are embedded into each other and the idea of the shore echo Broken Borders.

    Mustapha Akrim

    Mustapha Akrim
    Born in 1981, in Rabat, lives and works in Rabat and Sale

    Akrim’s installations question the nature of work and the difference between constructing and creating art in the light of a society in a state of constant changes. He is part of a young generation of Moroccan visual artists that are developing a proper language in order to profile new fundamentals of expression, directly connected to the awareness of the history and the dynamics of power.

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    Mustapha Akrim

    Mustapha Akrim
    Mustapha Akrim
    Mustapha Akrim
    Mustapha Akrim
    Mustapha Akrim
    Born in 1981, in Rabat, lives and works in Rabat and Sale

    Akrim’s installations question the nature of work and the difference between constructing and creating art in the light of a society in a state of constant changes. He is part of a young generation of Moroccan visual artists that are developing a proper language in order to profile new fundamentals of expression, directly connected to the awareness of the history and the dynamics of power.

    Nadia Kaabi-Linke

    Nadia Kaabi-Linke
    Born in 1978, in Tunis, Tunisia, lives and works in Berlin, Germany

    NKL’s installations, objects and pictorial works are embedded in urban contexts, intertwined with memory and cultural heritages. Her production is about manufacturing strangeness in what we usually consider the ordinary. Her active and constructive use of disturbing contradictions generates also a performative that brings beauty and violence together as well as refinement and brutality or the sublime and vulgarism. The results can be as shocking as clandestine, as cruel as artful, and sometimes it is as humorous as it might be sad.

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    Nadia Kaabi-Linke

    Nadia Kaabi-Linke
    Nadia Kaabi-Linke
    Nadia Kaabi-Linke
    Nadia Kaabi-Linke
    Nadia Kaabi-Linke
    Nadia Kaabi-Linke
    Born in 1978, in Tunis, Tunisia, lives and works in Berlin, Germany

    NKL’s installations, objects and pictorial works are embedded in urban contexts, intertwined with memory and cultural heritages. Her production is about manufacturing strangeness in what we usually consider the ordinary. Her active and constructive use of disturbing contradictions generates also a performative that brings beauty and violence together as well as refinement and brutality or the sublime and vulgarism. The results can be as shocking as clandestine, as cruel as artful, and sometimes it is as humorous as it might be sad.

    Nadia Kaabi-Linke, Smell, 2012

    A Handshake of Holiness and Profanity

    In 1974, Gil Scott-Heron punched the lines, “The Revolution will not be televised…the revolution will be live”. The place of revolution is the street; it happens on the pavement, it burns and it smells. However, media accroach these kinds of events with their own spin, and so it happened that last year's uprisings in Tunisia were broadcasted as the “Jasmine Revolution”. This label was everything but homegrown. The refreshing scent of jasmine flowers was absent those days because jasmine does not flourish before May and the real smell of the Tunisian revolution rose from burning cars and houses.
    One year later, people still go out into the street in Tunisia to protest for freedom and human rights. Now the protest is not directed against an autocratic regime but against regressive Salafi movements which represent the Islamic extremism in North Africa. Their “flag” with the white calligraphy of the Shahada, the Muslim confession of faith, on black background became the new symbol for political repression.
    Smell is an embroidery of jasmine flowers sewn on a black cloth, representing the Islamic creed. As repression continues, the blossoms wilt and the scent of jasmine fades away.
    One week before the closing of the exhibition Chkoun Ahna, a group of more than a hundred Salafists attacked the Printemps des Art Fair in La Marsa, a suburb of Tunis not far away from the National Museum of Carthage. The artists were accused of blasphemy and profanity and even received death threats. The government had more comprehension of the looting mob than courage to defend the rights of freedom of expression. The Minister of Culture and Heritage even camouflaged his intent of censorship behind the need to institutionalize the protection of the Sacred in the new Tunisian constitution. Following these events, Kaabi-Linke decided to donate the work SMELL to a staff member who worked at the National Museum of Carthage and who appeared to be a Salafi. When he first saw the work, he said that it showed what he carried in his heart and asked NKL if he could take it when the exhibition was over.
    After the show, when I put the work into his hands, I asked him if the continual crumbling, withering and powdering of the flowers searing under the sun wouldn’t bother him. No, he said; he would take care of it as he ever does for his belief in God. Since the Shahada is written in blossoms on the black tissu he would add new flowers to the work as it disintegrated. After the attacks and menace against Tunisian artist in June 2012, I never would have thought of finding a Salafist who is that committed to a piece of contemporary art. Far from being in charge of the restoration, he was worshipping SMELL. While I saw a conceptual and even critical piece of art regarding that relates the very specific context of Tunisia after the civil uprisings in Spring 2011, he found his own private belief and universal religious truth. It was astonishing to see how easy opposite perceptions like holiness and profanity could match in the same object; and again it confirmed the very dialectics of a piece of art that always seems to be more one could see, feel and hear.

    by
    Timo Kaabi-Linke

  • Nicène Kossentini

    Nicène Kossentini
    Born in 1976, In Sfax, Tunisia, lives and works between Tunis and Paris

    Nicène Kossentini expresses works essentially with the media photography and video, although sometimes, her curiosity to explore other mediums led her to glass painting and installations: "I'm at a crossroad, I like to find my own techniques to tell my ideas," said Kossetini. Her recurring themes are memory and the questioning on identities.

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    Nicène Kossentini

    Nicène Kossentini
    Nicène Kossentini
    Nicène Kossentini
    Nicène Kossentini
    Born in 1976, In Sfax, Tunisia, lives and works between Tunis and Paris

    Nicène Kossentini expresses works essentially with the media photography and video, although sometimes, her curiosity to explore other mediums led her to glass painting and installations: "I'm at a crossroad, I like to find my own techniques to tell my ideas," said Kossetini. Her recurring themes are memory and the questioning on identities.

    Nida Sinnokrot

    Nida Sinnokrot
    Born in 1971, in the USA, currently lives and works in Palestine

    Nida Sinnokrot is a film maker and an artist. His films as his installations and sculptures explore the complex reality of conflicts and diaspora. He employs a variety of media to transform ordinary objects or actions into sensory experiences that reveal the complexity of forms and perceptions trapped within the mundane. KA transposes an ancient belief into a contemporary sculpture, the figure of the raised-arms, had already been a symbolic form in Egyptian hieroglyphs.

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    Nida Sinnokrot

    Nida Sinnokrot
    Nida Sinnokrot
    Nida Sinnokrot
    Nida Sinnokrot
    Born in 1971, in the USA, currently lives and works in Palestine

    Nida Sinnokrot is a film maker and an artist. His films as his installations and sculptures explore the complex reality of conflicts and diaspora. He employs a variety of media to transform ordinary objects or actions into sensory experiences that reveal the complexity of forms and perceptions trapped within the mundane. KA transposes an ancient belief into a contemporary sculpture, the figure of the raised-arms, had already been a symbolic form in Egyptian hieroglyphs.

    An ambivalent pose that combines engineering and a sacred gesture in an iconic object that is as much beckoning the heaven as it expresses despair.

    ...

    Nida Sinnokrot's statement about Ka (Carthage)


    "Sublime Pathos"

    Ka (JCB,JCB) made from two standing backhoe arms (image 4), transposes the raised-arms Egyptian hieroglyph of an ancient belief system into a contemporary sculpture. An iconoclastic icon, all critique and political imperative follows from this simple clash between techne and primal pose.
    Backhoe arms turned upwards from their intended orientation speak to a refusal to dig, a refusal to comply, a refusal to keep one's head down. Given the chain reaction of events, sparked by the selfimmolation of Mohamed Bouazizi, a young Tunisian vegetable vendor, that spread across the Arab world, sending chills down the backs of the regionʼs dictators, this work of art seemed a fitting testament to Tunisia's Jasmine Revolution.
    As the exhibition opening drew closer however, we were increasing met with obstacles which threatened to prevent this work from being installed inside the museum. Nevertheless, despite protest from the Minister of Culture, the exhibition's curators were willing to take all risks. With forklifts, cranes, and technicians standing by at the ready, we received a message that defying the will of the existing order would put the entire exhibition at risk of being shut-down. I complied.
    Ka (Carthage) now, rather than assuming it's defiant, upright posture lays flat on the ground,
    exhausted, unable to right itself. Here the work cannot be perceived as intended but rather is
    grounded (literally) in the encounter of looking down upon it form the balcony above, a position of
    pathos. Perhaps in Tunisia a repose is required before the next phase of the revolution, before
    reawakening this sleeping giant. Perhaps this pathos will once again become sublime.

    Nida Sinnokrot - May 11, 2012

    Pascal Hachem

    Pascal Hachem
    Born in 1979, in Beirut, Lebanon, lives and works in Beirut, Lebanon

    The work of Pascal Hachem is essentially based on performances and installations, which are often mechanized due to the artist’s background in engineering. He combines usual objects in irritating apparatuses that reflect political, social and environmental subtexts. His machines often cause an embarrassing feeling, as the series of hammers that slowly destroy the wall on which the apparatus is installed; or a T-shirt ripping because of the increasing weight of sand; or knives emerging from the sand; or the installation DIY with a chain of scissors which invites the viewer to interact with the work by pressing pedals on the floor that get the machine going.

    Read more

    Pascal Hachem

    Pascal Hachem
    Pascal Hachem
    Pascal Hachem
    Pascal Hachem
    Pascal Hachem
    Pascal Hachem
    Born in 1979, in Beirut, Lebanon, lives and works in Beirut, Lebanon

    The work of Pascal Hachem is essentially based on performances and installations, which are often mechanized due to the artist’s background in engineering. He combines usual objects in irritating apparatuses that reflect political, social and environmental subtexts. His machines often cause an embarrassing feeling, as the series of hammers that slowly destroy the wall on which the apparatus is installed; or a T-shirt ripping because of the increasing weight of sand; or knives emerging from the sand; or the installation DIY with a chain of scissors which invites the viewer to interact with the work by pressing pedals on the floor that get the machine going.

  • Pauline M’barek

    Pauline M’barek

    Read more

    Pauline M’barek

    Pauline M’barek
    Pauline M’barek

    Saâdane Afif

    Saâdane Afif

    Read more

    Saâdane Afif

    Saâdane Afif

    Sirine Fattouh

    Sirine Fattouh

    Read more

    Sirine Fattouh

    Sirine Fattouh
    Sirine Fattouh
    Sirine Fattouh

  • Taysir Batniji

    Taysir Batniji
    Born in 1966, lives and works in Palestine

    Taysir Batniji's artistic practice is based primarily on videos and photographs, often telling personal issues and dealing with displacement and its difficulties, as well as the social political and cultural context of Palestine.

    Read more

    Taysir Batniji

    Taysir Batniji
    Taysir Batniji
    Taysir Batniji
    Taysir Batniji
    Taysir Batniji
    Taysir Batniji
    Taysir Batniji
    Taysir Batniji
    Born in 1966, lives and works in Palestine

    Taysir Batniji's artistic practice is based primarily on videos and photographs, often telling personal issues and dealing with displacement and its difficulties, as well as the social political and cultural context of Palestine.

    His art work called Transit, presented as a Diaspora is witnessing this context: this is a work done on the borders of Egyptian-Israeli-Palestinian Rafah, which is forbidden to film or photograph and reflects the difficult conditions of the displacement of Palestinians. "Transit is part of a discussion I 'v been leading since 1997 on the concepts of movement and travel, voluntary or involuntary. I am particularly interested in the situation in-between: in-between identities, in between cultures- ... "

    Timo Nasseri

    Timo Nasseri

    Read more

    Timo Nasseri

    Timo Nasseri
    Timo Nasseri

    Yousef Moscatello

    Yousef Moscatello

    Read more

    Yousef Moscatello

    Yousef Moscatello
    Yousef Moscatello

  • Ziad Antar

    Ziad Antar

    Read more

    Ziad Antar

    Ziad Antar
    Ziad Antar
    Ziad Antar
    Ziad Antar
    Ziad Antar

    Zineb Sedira

    Zineb Sedira
    Born in Paris, France, lives and works in London, UK and Alger, Algeria

    For many years Zined Sedira has explored individual and collective memories and the issue of human movement through video, photography and installations. The artist explores the issues of transmission, language, mobility and the representations of cultural symbols and identities. 


    Read more

    Zineb Sedira

    Zineb Sedira
    Zineb Sedira
    Zineb Sedira
    Born in Paris, France, lives and works in London, UK and Alger, Algeria

    For many years Zined Sedira has explored individual and collective memories and the issue of human movement through video, photography and installations. The artist explores the issues of transmission, language, mobility and the representations of cultural symbols and identities. 


    "With Guardians of images, combining documentary film and installation, Sedira attempts to propose a revaluation and dissemination of the photographic work of the Algerian revolution Mohamed Kouaci, through stories of his widow, Safia Kouaci. Who has tried very hard since the photographer's death in 1997 to preserve these priceless archives of Algerian history".

TALKS   12  05  12

CHKOUN AHNA

Artists' Talk
au Musée National de Carthage

History and emergency state
Comment le quotidien avale les catastrophes

Working on site
Qu'est-ce qui rime avec la Tunisie?

Do It Yourself
Comment s'approprier le temps et les lieux?

Looking forward to…
Qu'attendez-vous de la prochaine édition de Carthage Contemporary?

Animé par Dr. Anthony Downey (directeur de l'Ibraaz)

Samedi, 12 mai 2012
de 14h00 à 16h00

PRESS ROOM

Download / Télécharger

Sponsors & Cultural partners

PARTENAIRES

PRODUCTION

INSTITUTIONS CULTURELLES

LES MINISTERES TUNISIENS PARTENAIRES

LES HÔTELS PARTENAIRES

MEDIAS PARTENAIRES

Sponsors & Cultural partners

PARTENAIRES

PRODUCTION

INSTITUTIONS CULTURELLES

LES MINISTERES TUNISIENS PARTENAIRES

LES HÔTELS PARTENAIRES

MEDIAS PARTENAIRES

Thanks

Gallery Circuit

Carthage Contemporary 2012 is the launch of a contemporary art platform that involves a number of cultural events like exhibitions, artists talk, a screening and a gallery weekend in the Northern suburbs of Tunis. The first edition of this annual meeting is a collaboration of different partners such as the National Museum of Carthage, art centres, off spaces and seven galleries in the surroundings of Carthage.

  • Galerie Ammar Farhat

    Fondée en 1988 par Abdelaziz Gorgi, la Galerie Ammar Farhat située à sidi Bou Said est la plus ancienne en exercice à Tunis. Dès sa création, la galerie s’est donné pour mission de participer au renouvellement des pratiques artistiques en Tunisie. Elle soutient des artistes s’exprimant dans une perspective contemporaine ouverte à la fois sur le monde et ancrée dans son environnement immédiat.

    La galerie Ammar Farhat a également ouvert ses cimaises à des artistes étrangers comme l’artiste marocain Férid Belkahia en 1999 et les artistes français Hervé di Rosa et François Bruetschy en 2006.

    La galerie a également participé à quelques manifestations artistiques à l’étranger : Artuel au Liban (1999), Art jonction à Cannes (1994), Docks Art Fair (2011) et Marrakech Art Fair (2011).

    Exposition collective « Dessins contemporains »

    Artistes

    Zoulikha Bouabdellah/ Wassim Ben Hassine
    Nicène Kossentini / Oussema Troudi / Héla Lamine
    Ymen / Nabil Saouabi

    du 12 au 30 mai 2012

    Contact :

    Adresse : 3, Rue El Ghemrini
    2026 Sidi Bou Said
    T.F. (+216) 727 927
    E. contact@agorgi.com

    www.galerie-ammar-farhat.com
  • Galerie le Violon Bleu

    La galerie le Violon Bleu a ouvert ses portes en Tunisie en 2004 à l’initiative de Mme Essia Hamdi.

    Le Violon Bleu est située dans le prestigieux village de Sidi Bou-Saïd, avec des vues exceptionnelles de Carthage et de la mer Méditerranée.

    Les choix de la galerie sont basés sur des artistes de renommée Internationale. Beaucoup de nos artistes sont inclus dans les collections publiques des institutions comme le Musée d’Art Moderne, New York et le British Muséum, Londres.

    Exposition collective « Transes »

    Artistes

    Mootaz Nasr
    Oussema Troudi
    Selima Karoui

    du 12 mai au 10 juin 2012

    Contact :

    Adresse : 12, Place Sidi Hassine
    2026 Sidi Bou Said
    T/ F (+216) 71 744 883
    E. info@leviolonbleu.com

    www.leviolonbleu.com
  • Cherif Fine Art

    A Sidi Bou Saïd, au pied de la colline, Cherif Fine Art s’est fait une réputation de galerie ouverte aux grands courants internationaux de la création picturale. La galerie expose des peintres étrangers et travaille également à promouvoir les peintres tunisiens sur la scène internationale.

    Exposition collective « Printaniière votre »

    Artistes

    Lamine Sassi
    Sawssen ben Hadj Hassine

    du 06 mai au 11 juin 2012

    Contact :

    20, Rue de la République
    2026 Sidi Bou Said
    T. (+216) 71 741 733
    F. (+216) 71 741 410
    E. cherif.hamadi@planet.tn

  • Espace d’Art Mille Feuilles

    L’espace d’art Mille Feuilles a été fondé en 1992. C’est un espace convivial, multiforme, qui se veut avant tout un espace fusionnel entre littérature et arts, puisque Mille Feuilles est également une librairie. Galerie active depuis voilà une vingtaine d’années, elle a permis à plusieurs artistes tunisiens modernes d’avant-garde de s’exprimer dans le cadre d’expositions collectives ou de personnelles. Mille Feuilles a eu le plaisir d’abriter quelques peintres de renommée
    internationale, comme Vladimir Velicovic, ou encore Pierre-Marc de Biasi, ou également l’exposition de portraits en hommage à Isabelle Huppert.

    Exposition collective « Tranche de vie »

    Artiste

    Mohamed Ali Bel Kadhi

    du 12 mai au 15 juin 2012

    Contact :

    99, Avenue Habib Bourguiba
    2070 Marsa Plage
    T. (+216) 71 744 229

  • Galerie El Marsa

    Etablie depuis 1994, Galerie El Marsa présente un panel d’artistes de différentes générations dont les approches artistiques très diverses représentent essentiellement la scène arabe, en particulier d’Afrique du Nord. Un espace où se côtoient aussi bien des artistes majeurs de l’art moderne et contemporain que des nouveaux talents de la jeune création. Dans un contexte encore nouveau de marché global, le programme d’expositions et les activités de la galerie contribuent à l’ouverture sur toute la région d’Afrique du Nord et du Moyen-Orient et sur le reste du monde. Notamment dans le cadre de sa participation à des évènements internationaux comme les foires d’art contemporain à Dubai, Abu Dhabi, Paris (Paris Photo, Art Paris), Lyon, Miami et Marrakech ou encore comme les expositions organisées avec des galeries étrangères telle que la New Sahara Gallery à Los Angeles.

    Exposition collective « Dessins et Coutures »

    Artiste

    Feryel Lakhdar

    du 12 au 30 mai 2012

    Contact :

    Adresse : 2, Place du Saf Saf
    2070 La Marsa
    T. (+216) 71 74 05 72 F. ( +216) 71 74 03 64
    E. info@galerielmarsa.com

    www.galerielmarsa.com
  • Kanvas Art Gallery

    Créée en 2006 par Yosr Ben Ammar, Kanvas Art Gallery s’est, de prime abord investi auprès des jeunes créateurs tunisiens. La galerie cherche essentiellement à exposer et à promouvoir localement et internationalement diverses expressions contemporaines tunisiennes et ceci indépendamment du médium utilisé. Les artistes défendus par la galerie sont peintres, sculpteurs, photographes, installateurs, graveurs

    Exposition collective « Pixels »

    Artistes

    Mohamed Ben Soltane / Omar Bey / Wassim Ghozlani
    Emanuelle Temimi Blanc / Ismael / Marie José Armando

    du 14 avril au 12 mai 2012

    Contact :

    37, Avenue Fattouma Bourguiba
    Sidi Fraj, La Soukra
    T. (+216) 71 863 351
    M. (+216) 98 42 63 50
    E. contact@kanvas-artgallery.com

    www.kanvas-artgallery.com
  • Galerie Kalysté

    Nichée au coeur des vergers de la Soukra, la galerie Kalysté a été inaugurée le 9 décembre 1993 par sa propriétaire Mme Melika Kastalli Ben Khelil et Sa fille Synda Ben Khelil Bouchrara. Le nom de Kalysté vient du mot latin kalystos, les grecs avaient surnommée Bastia (ile de Beauté, kalystè voir kalystos).

    Kalystè a vu passer sur ses cimaises tous les grands noms de la peinture Tunisienne a savoir A. Bellegha, H. ELmekki, B. Dhahk... toutes les tendances et genres y étaient présents. Elle ouvre ses portes aux jeunes artistes d’aujourd’hui : Du moderne au contemporain.

    Exposition personnelle « Hamda Dniden »

    Artiste

    Hamda Dniden

    du 05 mai au 26 mai 2012

    Contact :

    29 bis, Av Fatouma Bourguiba
    La Soukra, km12
    2036 Tunis
    T. (+216)71 759 900

  • Le Centre National d’Art Vivant

    Le Centre National d’Art Vivant de Tunis a été créée dans les années 70. Situé au coeur du belvédère, il met à la disposition de son public, une bibliothèque, un espace d’exposition et un espace d’expérimentation artistique dans le jardin.

    C’est un centre culturel et un espace d’animation artistique relevant du Ministère de la Culture qui a pour vocation première de faire connaître les productions plastiques tunisiennes et étrangères. L’objectif du centre est l’organisation d’expositions artistiques mais aussi de conférences, de workshops, de signatures de livres, de projections de films, de documentaires, et de débats.

    Le Centre National d’Art Vivant de Tunis veut encourager les nouveaux talents dans les différents arts notamment dans des dispositifs contemporains

    Exposition collective « Politics »

    Artistes

    Fakhri el Ghzel / Nidhal Chamekh / Ymene Chetouane
    Maher Gnaoui / Malek Gnaoui / Atef Maatallah / ismaël
    Ibrahim Matouss

    du 05 mai au 15 juin 2012

    Contact :

    68, Av. Taïeb M’hiri (place Pasteur)
    1002 Parc du Belvédère –Tunis
    T. (+216) 71.89.37.20
    E. centre.art.vivant@gmail.com
    FB. Centre National d’Art Vivant de Tunis

  • B’chira Art Center

    B’chira Art Center est un centre d’art contemporain indépendant, situé à Sabelet Ben Ammar et fondé par l’artiste Bchira Triki Bouazizi, peintre et céramiste.

    L’objectif de la fondatrice est d’offrir un lieu où se développent les pratiques artistiques contemporaines grâce à une structure professionnelle permettant aux artistes de produire, d’exposer et de réfléchir autour de leur travail artistique.

    Dans cette galerie nous pouvons retrouver des expositions d’art contemporain, des ateliers d’initiation et de perfectionnement (céramique, dessin, peinture, vidéo et autres ateliers ludiques…), des workshops sur des thématiques d’actualité, des rencontres avec les différents acteurs de la scène culturelle.

    Exposition collective « critic »

    Critiques d’art

    Amor Ghedamsi
    Sélima Karoui
    Ismaël
    Hamideddine Bouali
    Hama Hanachi

    Artistes

    Najet Gherissi
    Sélima Karoui
    Alaeddine Slim
    Zied Ben Romdhane
    Nicène Kossentini

    Contact :

    Sabelet Ben Ammar
    Sur la route de Sidi Thabet
    T. (+216) 70 527 767
    M. (+216) 22 618 197 / (+216) 25 899 196
    E. contact@bchirartcenter.com

    www.bchirartcenter.com

TALKS   12 05 12

CHKOUN AHNA

Artists' Talk
au Musée National de Carthage

History and emergency state
Comment le quotidien avale les catastrophes

Working on site
Qu'est-ce qui rime avec la Tunisie?

Do It Yourself
Comment s'approprier le temps et les lieux?

Looking forward to…
Qu'attendez-vous de la prochaine édition de Carthage Contemporary?

Animé par Dr. Anthony Downey (directeur de l'Ibraaz)

Samedi, 12 mai 2012
de 14h00 à 16h00

Contact

Carthage Contemporary Curatorial Team:
Khadija Hamdi,Timo Kaabi-Linke
E-mail: info[@]carthagecontemporary.com

www.carthagecontemporary.com

YALIL PRODUCTION

Adresse: Immeuble 45, Avenue du Japon,
1073 Montplaisir TUNIS TUNISIE

E-mail: contact@yalilprod.com
Tel: (+216) 71 908 488
Fax: (+216) 71 908 486

www.yalilprod.com

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